A New Kind of Bleak Free read ã 7

review ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ó Owen Hatherley

review ☆ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ó Owen Hatherley What happens when ruination overtakes regeneration Following on from A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain Owen Hatherley investigates the fate of British cities in the desolate new world of savage public sector cuts when government funds are withdrawn and the Welfare Sta. you kind of had to be there how many buildings for instance can be described as having intricate brickwork lol still great his final chapter on london and his chapter on belfast where he discovers that low level guerrilla war produced the same city as municipal neoliberalism are the two standouts

review A New Kind of Bleak

A New Kind of Bleak Free read ã 7 ✓ What happens when ruination overtakes regeneration Following on from A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain Owen Hatherley investigates the fate of British cities in the desolate new world of savage public sector cuts when government funds are withdrawn and the Welfare State abdicates He explores the urban Te abdicates He explores the urban conseuences of what Conservatives privately call the progressive nonsense of the Big Society and the localism agenda the putative replacement of the state with charity and voluntarism; and he casts an eye over the last great Blairite schemes. This is the second of Hatherley’s books that seems to draw his writings and commentaries elsewhere such as Building Design to provide us with a sceptical almost grumpy reading of urban design and architecture in contemporary Britain Like its predecessor A Guide to the New Ruins of Britain this is a travelogue – a little H V Morton a bit Nicholas Pevsner and with a pinch of Orwell Hatherley takes us through walking tours mainly of several to be expected and several surprising parts of urban Britain There are three London chapters – The Thames Gateway Croydon and The City several other major cities zones – Birmingham Bristol Edinburgh Glasgow some not really Britain – well Belfast some not really cities – The Valleys as in Wales not cities but urban and places the seem to get passed over in these kinds of discussions – Barrow in Furness Leicester Lincoln Plymouth Aberdeen Preston and Oxford Amid all of this there is a passion for the products of modernism but even passion for the contempt for the mess that urban Britain has become; the lazy or non planning the dull uninventive architecture the worse than weak design and the dullness imposed on cities by the Blair era alongside the destruction of urbanism resulting from the actions of the Lib Dem or as he prefers the Tory Whig government He may be a Militant Modernist or at least that is what he has titled his first book – which not to say that he is a militant proselytiser for all that modernism gave us his effusive praise for Holyrood shows that but a hunter for the wonders that modernism offered us and it seems at times on a uest for the residual utopian spaces in modernist designThis outlook this urban uest leads him to some surprising conclusions – praise for Cumbernauld one of Glasgow’s new towns towns in the Welsh valleys and Lincoln – alongside correct condemnation for the planning and design disaster that is Birmingham – not in its 19th century forms but its recent muddle Hatherley’s eye is sharp so than his tongue or pen but he is not averse to a harsh turn of phrase when needed – and his berating tone for some of the places I know is well deserved His greater strength however is his ability to politically contextualise – not locally so much as nationally – the things influencing in places even causing the fads he finds so disconcerting; neither new Labour nor the Tory Whig régimes emerge from this urban critiue with much credibility neither for that matter do many high profile architectsThat said there are two things that frustrate me First as with New Ruins the paper stock and poor uality photographs Laura Oldfield Ford’s drawings fare much better let the book down Second the races through 18 areas on 360 pages and in many cases we little than a paragraph per building; it all feels a little rushed and in need of focusThis isn’t to say I didn’t enjoy it but it might have helped to write about less Despite this Hatherley remains one of our best critics of the contempt shown for urbanity for design and for Britain’s residents by those who control make and continually recreate the places we live

Owen Hatherley Ó 7 Free download

A New Kind of BleakLimping to completion from London 's Shard to the site of the 2012 Olympics Crisscrossing Britain from Aberdeen to Plymouth from Croydon to Belfast A New Kind of Bleak finds a landscape left to rot and discovers strange and potentially radical things growing in the wasteland. I don't often give 5 stars This one gets it for a number of reasons First it was written recently and I love the raw feel that comes because the writer is living in the same world and same 'interesting' times as I do Secondly I hear a lifetime's passion for the built environment way beyond me of course he reads buildings with an insider's vocabulary and a feeling for the way it all happened that surely must come from living and working in the business for decades and not from learning about it second hand Thirdly the anger Very entertaining in the sense that you have to laugh or you would be crying forever especially with our own town about to be gutted by the greedy developers And lastly leaving me itching to get out there into the towns and cities with my eyes wide open to try and see for myself I will never have the knowledge and experience to see places with the author's eyes but I am inspired to look around me in a new and richer way and even if I have to be angry at a lot of what I see it's not worth missing the experience