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characters Lifted by Andreas Bernard ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ↠ Before skyscrapers forever transformed the landscape of the modern metropolis the conveyance that made them possible had to be created Invented in New York in the 1850s the elevator became an urban fact of life on both sides of the Atlantic by the Ties as a space of simultaneous intimacy and anonymity constantly in motion In this elegant and fascinating book Andreas Bernard explores how the appearance of this new element changed notions of verticality and urban space Transforming such landmarks as the Waldorf Astoria and Ritz Tower in New York he traces how the elevator uickly took hold in large American cities while gaining much slower acceptance in European cities like Paris and Berlin Combining technological and architectural history with the literary and cinematic Bernard opens up new ways of looking at the elevator as a secular confessional when. This review was originally posted to my blog at Andreas Bernard’s Lifted A Cultural History of the Elevator published February 14 2014 is a fascinating look at the history of the elevator and how it transformed how Westerners conceived of vertical space much like the railroad transformed horizontal space during the nineteenth century The book begins with a discussion of how the story of Elisha Graves Otis’ demonstration of the safety catch on an elevator in 1854 became the starting point for the architectural history of the device although Bernard points out that not only had freight elevators been around for years it was the Otis Company’s domination of the elevator market that allowed them to write their own history so to speakFor the most part because this book was originally written in German for a German audience the history focuses primarily on the elevator in that country but draws several interesting comparisons with other European nations and the United States The Americans were for the most part early adopters of elevator technology and innovations Bernard notes that this innovation came in the form of electric powered elevators steel frame construction that allowed for taller buildings and safety features Building design itself changed moving the elevator to the very center of buildings and leading to the construction of standardized floor design with clean and open corridors Bernard finds that this “alignment” paralleled similar developments with street layouts during the mid to late nineteenth century The elevator also performed an important cultural function changing the value assigned to floors in a building the upper floors used to be far less desirable or were for staffAnd while I felt Bernard perhaps spent too much time on segues into the cultural history of spaces like “the garret” and on the elevator as confessional Lifted is a readable and interesting account of how technology can alter both space and culture Also I have one very minor uibble which is probably the result of a translation error Parker Posey played Tom Hanks’ girlfriend not his wife in the movie “You’ve Got Mail”Source ARC from the publisher via NetGalley

Lifted by Andreas BernaTies as a space of simultaneous intimacy and anonymity constantly in motion In this elegant and fascinating book Andreas Bernard explores how the appearance of this new element changed notions of verticality and urban space Transforming such landmarks as the Waldorf Astoria and Ritz Tower in New York he traces how the elevator uickly took hold in large American cities while gaining much slower acceptance in European cities like Paris and Berlin Combining technological and architectural history with the literary and cinematic Bernard opens up new ways of looking at the elevator as a secular confessional when. This review was originally posted to my blog at Andreas Bernard’s Lifted A Cultural History of the Elevator published February 14 2014 is a fascinating look at the history of the elevator and how it transformed how Westerners conceived of vertical space much like the railroad transformed horizontal space during the nineteenth century The book begins with a discussion of how the story of Elisha Graves Otis’ demonstration of the safety catch on an elevator in 1854 became the starting point for the architectural history of the device although Bernard points out that not only had freight elevators been around for years it was the Otis Company’s domination of the elevator market that allowed them to write their own history so to speakFor the most part because this book was originally written in German for a German audience the history focuses primarily on the elevator in that country but draws several interesting comparisons with other European nations and the United States The Americans were for the most part early adopters of elevator technology and innovations Bernard notes that this innovation came in the form of electric powered elevators steel frame construction that allowed for taller buildings and safety features Building design itself changed moving the elevator to the very center of buildings and leading to the construction of standardized floor design with clean and open corridors Bernard finds that this “alignment” paralleled similar developments with street layouts during the mid to late nineteenth century The elevator also performed an important cultural function changing the value assigned to floors in a building the upper floors used to be far less desirable or were for staffAnd while I felt Bernard perhaps spent too much time on segues into the cultural history of spaces like “the garret” and on the elevator as confessional Lifted is a readable and interesting account of how technology can alter both space and culture Also I have one very minor uibble which is probably the result of a translation error Parker Posey played Tom Hanks’ girlfriend not his wife in the movie “You’ve Got Mail”Source ARC from the publisher via NetGalley

review ð eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Andreas Bernard

Lifted by Andreas Bernard ´ Before skyscrapers forever transformed the landscape of the modern metropolis the conveyance that made them possible had to be created Invented in New York in the 1850s the elevator became an urban fact of life on both sides of the Atlantic by the early twentieth century While it may at first glance seem a modest innovation it had wide ranging effects from fundamentally restructuring building design to reinforcing social class hierarchies by moving luxury apartments to upper levels previously the domain of the lower classes The cramped elevator cabin itself served as a reflection of life in modern growing ci. The world we live in has been shaped in deep and profound ways by technologies we barely think about Lifted is a fascinating maddening idiosyncratic exploration of one of them a book about elevators as a force that transformed cities and the experience of living and working in them Elevators forced architects to make the internal arrangement of buildings uniform and systematically organized They ushered in the era of standardized floor plans standard height floors and consecutive floor numbering They made possible the roof garden did away with the stuffy attic garret democratized access to the street by making a trip to the 14th floor no work than a trip to the 4th They turned the upper floors of tall buildings into desirable expensive spaces for the first time creating a world in which social class mapped—in a linear straightforward way—onto the structure of the building Andreas Bernard traces these changes as they unfolded in mostly Berlin New York and Paris between the 1850s and about 1900 He focuses on what we would now think of as mid rise office and residential buildings and winds up his narrative just before the beginning of the skyscraper era Three of the four chapters of Lifted dig deeply into these neglected aspects of elevator history and will likely fascinate readers interested in architecture urban planning and the history of nineteenth century city life The fourth shortest chapter considers the evolution of elevator controls the gradual de skilling of the elevator operator’s job and the psychology of the push button—a gift for those intrigued by technology labor and their intersection but slightly out of place in the larger narrative Bernard writes about all these issues with verve and analyzes them in sophisticated but accessible ways What is missing from Lifted is a clear chronological framework into which readers can fit this information Bernard gives little sense of the evolution of the elevator over time its spread through the world’s cities and its progress from luxury add on to basic infrastructure The chapters because of their thematic organization zigzag back and forth across the same material multiple times from multiple perspectives Cutting the story off at the beginning of the skyscraper age—a decision that like the thematic chapters serves the story that Bernard wants to tell—further diminishes the book’s appeal to broader audiences for whom the marriage of elevator and skyscraper is the most familiar part of the story Lifted is not a linear narrative driven book about the history of technology in the vein of Henry Petroski The Pencil or Tom Standage The Victorian Internet It is however a thoughtful well written eye opening book and—for anyone interested in the emergence of the modern city—an essential one review ð eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Andreas Bernard

Andreas Bernard × 7 characters

Andreas Bernard × 7 characters Stalled between floors or as a recurring space in which couples fall in love Rising upwards through modernity Lifted takes the reader on a compelling ride through the history of the elevator Andreas Bernard is editor of Suddeutsche Zeitung Germany's largest daily newspaper He received his PhD in Cultural Sciences from the Bauhaus University Weimar and teaches cultural studies in Berlin and Lucerne Switzerland“The elevator which today seems so boring was once a vehicle of change of compelling power Whoever reads this book will view the world’s elevators with different eyes” Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitun. German cultural historian Andreas Bernard noticed that a large number of German TV ads took place in elevators He began to wonder what made the elevator such a popular spot to promote deodorant nail polish eyeglasses and other products His research led to this academically inclined cultural history of the elevator Bernard explains how elevators made possible buildings of than four or five stories and how they contributed to fundamental design changes in the way hotels apartment buildings and offices are laid out For example before elevators the upper floors of any building were the least desirable; they were hard to reach and were believed to be bad for your health picture the starving artist in a garret or attic room After elevators the most posh accommodations were to be found on the highest floors commanding sweeping views and symbolizing the occupants' high social statusBernard also explores how elevators function as plot devices in stories and films Sometimes they are secret spaces where superheroes or others with hidden identities change clothes or where illicit lovers share a moment of intimacy Sometimes they serve as secular confessional boxes where secrets are revealed Most often elevators serve to bring together characters who might not otherwise have met often when the elevator gets stuck which happens far in fiction than in real lifeBernard focuses on the use design and narrative role of elevators primarily in New York City and in Germany from about the mid nineteenth century to the 1920s and '30s although some discussion ranges as close to the present as movies from the last few decades with key scenes set in elevators His style can be a bit stilted and I think the translation makes up a few words to compensate for long compound German words that have no exact euivalent in English Overall though I found this a very interesting read It opened my eyes to the impact of elevators on modern city life and storytelling