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Uprooted characters ô 106 ☆ On the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II— from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin   Just seventy five years ago the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it roundedOn the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor comes a harrowing and enlightening look at the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II from National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin   Just seventy five years ago the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today it rounded up over 100000 of its own citizens based on nothing than their ancestry. I've had this on my library wishlist for awhile and after finishing George Takei's They Called Us Enemy I decided it was time to listen to this I'm glad I read them in this order Takei's book was understandably focused on his family's experience in the internment camps and how that affected them during and after the war In Uprooted the focus is much broader and the research that was put into this was incredibly comprehensive It helped to have Takei's personal account so fresh in my mind while listening to this Marrin gives us a well rounded and thorough history of this time period that saw over 100000 Japanese immigrants and Japanese Americans dislocated from their homes into internment camps based on nothing but rumor hysteria and racism He starts by going back even further to give an account of ancient Japan's traditions and how it became the imperial Japan of WWII It delved into the racism of Imperial Japan and the atrocities that they committed against China Korea and other countries and island nations that they took over He then goes back to detail how racism in the US developed against the Chinese and Japanese immigrants during the late 1800s and early 1900s and how that impacted decisions made after Pearl Harbor In this way the reader can have a full understanding of the mindsets in both Japan and America at the time of Pearl HarborHe delves into all the various aspects of the uprooting and how the US government treated the Japanese Americans before during and after the war including those already in service before Pearl Harbor detailing the various accomplishments and acts of bravery that Japanese Americans soldiers performed in WWII both in the Pacific theater and on the European front He discusses as well the history of internment laws themselves which every country has I was surprised to learn some things like how FDR had immigrants from Italy Germany and Japan deported from South American countries to the US to hold here in case we needed to trade them for US POWs One of these camps was in Santa Fe just south of where they were working on the atomic bombThe Japanese uprooting went across all political lines and ideologies from Republican to Democrat conservative to liberal This doesn't let anyone off the hook It lays all the facts bare and does it unflinchingly using a variety of firsthand accounts from politicians and internees and citing the laws and propaganda from the media to Hollywood that helped fuel the hysteria For anyone wanting to know about this time period this is an excellent place to start It's not an easy book to get through but it is an important one

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And suspicious of their loyalty kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years   How could this have happened Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and carefully follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation’s most beloved presidents to make this decision Meanwhile it also illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism. This is such an important read particularly in our current political climate

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UprootedAnd xenophobia which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor ultimately tying the two countries together   Today America is still filled with racial tension and personal liberty in wartime is as relevant a topic as ever Moving and impactful National Book Award finalist Albert Marrin’s sobering exploration of this monumental injustice shines as bright a light on current events as it does on the pas. When I finished this I wanted to turn around and reread it again I really liked author Albert Marrin's turn of phrases and found myself wanting to write them down I read it on the elliptical machine and writing notes wasn't in my wheels I'm not that skilled at multi tasking The overall message is that racism exists all over the world and that people need to learn from the past or they will repeat it The framework of the book begins with racist views promoted by the Japanese during World War II in Japan a bit of China Germany and last America The views in America and the uestionable decisions by leaders to incarcerate Japanese Americans without due process during WWII is brought to light Marrin puts the issues in historical context and shows how the actions by leaders and the justice system as well as the use of media influenced and later changed the public's mind to overturn the unjust laws infringing on civil rights He points out leaders that had racist views and shows how it mirrored the national or global dialogue at the time He argues that racism harms countries and the civilians leading to poor decisions and harmful conseuences A well written and thoughtful book that I highly recommend