By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans Characters Î 2

Greg Robinson È 2 Review

By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans Characters Î 2 È On February 19 1942 following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and Japanese Army successes in the Pacific President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a fateful order In the name of security Executive OrdeParticipation and interventions were critical in determining the nature duration and conseuences of the administration's internment policy By Order of the President attempts to explain how a great humanitarian leader and his advisors who were fighting a war to preserve democracy could have implemented such a profoundly unjust and undemocratic policy toward their own people It reminds us of the power of a president's beliefs to influence and determine public policy and of the need for citizen vigilance to protect the rights of all against potential abuses. Explores the role of FDR in the internment Undoubtedly he played a role as president but it is actually hard to tell what that role is Robinson takes a good stab at contextualizing Roosevelt's involvement

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On February 19 1942 following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and Japanese Army successes in the Pacific President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a fateful order In the name of security Executive Order 9066 allowed for the summary removal of Japanese aliens and American citizens of Japanese descent from their West Coast homes and their incarceration under guard in camps Amid the numerous histories and memoirs devoted to this shameful event FDR's contributions have been seen as negligible Now using Roosevelt's own writings his advisors' letters and. The book starts out acknowledging that the internment of the Japanese Americans does not really compare to the Rape of Nanking or the deaths of Jews during the Holocaust but it's a particular stain on American history since it was largely American citizens that were rounded up and interned without any specific charges or trials and without any change to defend their own loyalty to the countryAs such it was especially bad in that we were fighting the war to preserve democracy which supposedly guarantees the right of all its citizens to be treated eually under the lawThe book then goes into the history of the Roosevelt family itself and its ties to the Orient This includes FDR's growing concern as he himself grew up with Japan's growing economic ability and military potential especially after they defeated the Russians in their 1905 warThe book also recounts the history of the anti Japanese movement in California prior to the second world war FDR as early as around 1913 considered that a US Japanese war was highly possible in the futureMore of the pre WWII history of FDR is covered along with various books and people that influenced him in his view of Japan There's a great deal of detail in this part of the bookAs the years went on Roosevelt became and worried about a possible war with Japan As for what was happening in the US he was hampered by the fact that there were no Japanese American or other Asian American people on the White House staff nor were there even any links to the Asian communities in the US meaning the White House was operating without knowing anything about what the Japanese Americans were thinking or doingRoosevelt was uite concerned about the Japanese and Japanese Americans in Hawaii and a study was done in 1933 by Army Intelligence Displaying the usual lack of intelligence such a group generally has the report noted Japanese racial traits such as moral inferiority to whites fanaticism duplicity and arrogance The Japanese Americans there the report claimed were fiercely loyal to Tokyo and the majority of them would prove disloyal to the US if war ever cameJapanese ships put in at Hawaii and some of the sailors from the ships had relatives among the local residents Concerned about this FDR actually wroteOne obvious thought occurs to me that every Japanese citizen or non citizen on the Island of Oahu who meets these Japanese ships or has any connection with their officers or men should be secretly but definitely identified and his or her name placed on a special list of those who would be the first to be placed in a concentration camp in the event of troubleThus it was apparent that as of 1936 the time FDR stated the above he was already considering the use of what would later become the internment camps The Japanese invasion of China in 1937 and especially the Rape of Nanking did not do anything to improve FDR's view of the JapaneseA 1940 memo proposed various steps for dealing with preparations for war including Prepare plans for concentration camps A November report by the FBI in Hawaii though indicated that the earlier military report predicting disaster was wrong and that only a very small number of the Japanese and Japanese Americans in Hawaii would pose any potential problem and that further the group was not hard to identify at all something which would prove useful in rounding up potential troublesome peopleFDR initiated a secret study in 1941 on Japanese Americans A Midwestern Republican businessman named Curtis B Munsen headed the study using a number of special agents The results of his study were very positive in relation to the Japanese AmericansWe do not want to throw a lot of American citizens into a concentration camp of course and especially as the almost unanimous verdict is that in cas

Review By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans

By Order of the President FDR and the Internment of Japanese AmericansDiaries and internal government documents Greg Robinson reveals the president's central role in making and implementing the internment and examines not only what the president did but whyRobinson traces FDR's outlook back to his formative years and to the early twentieth century's racialist view of ethnic Japanese in America as immutably foreign and threatening These prejudicial sentiments along with his constitutional philosophy and leadership style contributed to Roosevelt's approval of the unprecedented mistreatment of American citizens His hands on. I must say that I was a bit disappointed in this book The majority of books I have read on this topic have garnered at least 4 starsI thought his writing though was rather surgical meaning without emotionOne must admit that this is an emotional topic but it read much like a text book or governmental report