Download The Sakura Obsession ¶ PDF DOC TXT or eBook

Free read The Sakura Obsession

Download The Sakura Obsession ¶ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ð The remarkable 1200 year history of the Japanese cherry blossom tree and how it was saved from extinction by an English gardenerCollingwood Cherry Ingram first fell in love with the sakura or cherry tree when he visited Japan on his honeymoon in 1907 So taken with the plTed a garden of cherry varieties In 1926 he learned that the Great White Cherry had become extinct in Japan Six years later he buried a living cutting from his own collection in a potato and repatriated it via the Trans Siberian Express In the years that followed Ingram sent than 100 varieties of cherry tree to new homes around the globe from. I sure enjoyed the first half of this immensely but then it got into the war which was too sad and depressing I learned some things I had never heard before and had to uit reading it for a bit I got back into the book when she went back to telling about cherry trees and three of the oldest one of which is 1500 years old It is almost as old as a bristle cone pine I greatly admire Ingram and it was so fun reading about him I recommend this for everyone but especially those who love nature and gardens

characters ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ¸ Naoko Abe

The remarkable 1200 year history of the Japanese cherry blossom tree and how it was saved from extinction by an English gardenerCollingwood Cherry Ingram first fell in love with the sakura or cherry tree when he visited Japan on his honeymoon in 1907 So taken with the plant he brought back hundreds of cuttings with him to England where he crea. From BBC radio 4 Book of the weekCollingwood Ingram known as 'Cherry' after his defining life's work was born in 1880 and lived to a hundred years old witnessing a fraught century of conflict and changeIngram's interest was piued by visits to Japan in 1902 and 1907 and further when he moved to The Grange in Benenden Kent in 1919 and discovered two magnificent cherry trees in the neglected garden of his new family home They reminded him of his Japanese trips and he fell in love with cherry blossoms or sakura dedicating much of his life to their cultivation and preservationOn a further visit to Japan in 1926 to find new specimens and meet other experts Ingram was shocked to see the loss of local cherry diversity a conseuence of industrialisation and modernisation driven by the need to rebuild after a devastating earthuake which destroyed vast areas of traditional housing There was also an unsettling political undercurrent and pernicious ideology at work A cloned cherry the Somei yoshino was taking over the landscape and becoming the symbol of Japan's expansionist ambitionsFor Ingram the most striking absence from the Japanese cherry scene was that of Taihaku a brilliant ‘great white’ cherry tree A proud example of this tree grew in his English garden and he swore to return it to its native home Multiple attempts to send Taihaku scions back to Japan ended in failure but Ingram persisted Over decades he became one of the world’s leading cherry experts and shared the joy of sakura both nationally and internationally Every spring we enjoy his legacy‘Cherry’ Ingram is a portrait of this little known Englishman a story of Britain and Japan in the twentieth century and an exploration of the delicate blossoms whose beauty is admired around the worldIn Episode 1 the author keeps seeing the name of Collingwood Ingram associated with the preservation of ancient cherries and wants to find out about this fascinating manWritten and translated by Naoko AbeRead by Hattie MorahanAbridged by Isobel Creed and Lizzie DaviesProduced by Lizzie DaviesA Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4httpswwwbbccoukprogrammesm000

Naoko Abe ¸ 0 Download

The Sakura ObsessionAuckland to Washington As much a history of the cherry blossom in Japan as it is the story of one remarkable man the narrative follows the flower from its adoption as a national symbol in 794 through its use as an emblem of imperialism in the 1930s to the present day worldwide obsession with forecasting the exact moment of the trees' flowering. As an avid gardener ok obsessive who had to seek out flowering cherry trees within a hundred mile radius I loved this book But this book is far than gardening it’s Japanese history and sadly my beloved cherry trees are forever linked to the fleeting lives of youth in war Such a contrast from beauty to death love books that teach me new things but not sure I like what I learned